A retina with at least ten spectral types of photoreceptors in a mantis shrimp

@article{Cronin1989ARW,
  title={A retina with at least ten spectral types of photoreceptors in a mantis shrimp},
  author={Thomas W. Cronin and N. Justin Marshall},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1989},
  volume={339},
  pages={137-140}
}
STOMATOPOD crustaceans, commonly named mantis shrimps, have compound eyes of unique design. A central band composed of six parallel rows of ommatidia separates two peripheral ommatidial groups, and all three regions view the same area of visual space1–3. In the central bands of members of the stomatopod superfamily Gonodactyloidea, four of the ommatidial rows are built of tiers of photoreceptors; in two of these rows, the photoreceptors themselves contain coloured filters4. Such a design could… 
Multiple spectral classes of photoreceptors in the retinas of gonodactyloid stomatopod crustaceans
TLDR
These stomatopod species have retained the typical crustacean layered rhabdoms in the peripheral retina and the 2 most ventral rows of the central band, but have converted the photoreceptors of the 4 dorsal rows ofThe central band into as many as 8 narrowly tuned spectral classes, which could serve a high-quality hue discrimination system.
Specialization of retinal function in the compound eyes of mantis shrimps
Tuning of photoreceptor function in three mantis shrimp species that inhabit a range of depths. II. Filter pigments
TLDR
The changes in filter density and spectrum increased absolute sensitivity in retinas of animals living at greater depths, and tuned their long-wavelength photoreceptors for improved function in the bluer light available in deep water.
Spectral tuning and the visual ecology of mantis shrimps.
TLDR
Results show that receptors of the peripheral photoreceptors, those outside the midband which are responsible for standard visual tasks such as spatial vision and motion detection, reveal the well-known pattern of decreasing lambdamax with increasing depth.
Photoreceptor spectral diversity in the retinas of squilloid and lysiosquilloid stomatopod crustaceans
TLDR
Spectral sensitivity functions were estimated for the lysiosquilloid species based on estimates of visual pigment λnax, photoreceptor dimensions, and specific absorbances of the visual pigments and intrarhabdomal filters, and squilloids have retinas that are much simpler.
Molecular diversity of visual pigments in Stomatopoda (Crustacea)
TLDR
Stomatopod crustaceans possess apposition compound eyes that contain more photoreceptor types than any other animal described, and intra- and interspecific clusters of highly similar transcripts suggest that there has been rampant recent gene duplication within the stem crustacean lineage.
Tuning of photoreceptor function in three mantis shrimp species that inhabit a range of depths. I. Visual pigments
TLDR
This work characterized the visual pigment complements of three species of stomatopod crustaceans, Haptosquilla trispinosa, Gonodactylellus affinis, and Gonodactsylopsis spongicola, which are unusual for this group in that each lives at depths from the subtidal to several tens of meters.
The retinas of mantis shrimps from low-light environments (Crustacea; Stomatopoda; Gonodactylidae)
TLDR
Modifications in the retinas of 3 species of stomatopods in the superfamily Gonodactyloidea seen primarily as specializations of the intrarhabdomal filters decrease the spectral range and number of types of narrow-band spectral classes of phooreceptors, while increasing their sensitivity.
Visual pigment diversity in two genera of mantis shrimps implies rapid evolution (Crustacea; Stomatopoda)
TLDR
The variation within closely related species of the same genus implies that visual pigments can evolve rapidly in stomatopod crustaceans, andVisual pigments of the tiered rows of the midband span a larger spectral range in shallow-water than deepwater species.
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