A reappraisal of early hominid phylogeny.

@article{Strait1997ARO,
  title={A reappraisal of early hominid phylogeny.},
  author={David S. Strait and Frederick E. Grine and Marc A. Moniz},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={1997},
  volume={32 1},
  pages={
          17-82
        }
}
We report here on the results of a new cladistic analysis of early hominid relationships. [] Key Method Ingroup taxa included Australopithecus afarensis, Australopithecus africanus, Australopithecus aethiopicus, Australopithecus robustus, Australopithecus boisei, Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis, Homo ergaster and Homo sapiens. Outgroup taxa included Pan troglodytes and Gorilla gorilla. Sixty craniodental characters were selected for analysis.
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TLDR
The present analysis indicates that Otavipithecus is most closely related to Afropithecus, as previously suggested by Andrews (1992 a) among others, and a conservative interpretation, that these taxa represented related but divergent lineages of a late early Miocene hominoid radiation, is currently favored.
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  • T. Wood
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • 2010
TLDR
The present results indicate that Homo habilis, Homo rudolfensis, and—most surprisingly—Australopithecus sediba belong in the human holobaramin.
Whence Australopithecus africanus? Comparing the Skulls of South African and East African Australopithecus
TLDR
The fact that Australopithecus africanus is phenetically similar to Paranthropus and Homo allows it to endure as similar to each in cladistics analyses without resolving its exact phylogenetic position, which permits the development of a variety of both evolutionary and biogeographic models to explain the conundrum of A. afAfricanus.
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  • Environmental Science, Geography
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  • 2003
TLDR
An examination of extant hominid anatomical variability indicates that the range of fossil hominin variability supports the recognition of this large number of fossil species, and suggests that Kenyanthropus and Homo both share a pattern of peramorphosis, associated with sequential hypermorphosis in brain development and paedomorphosis processes in cranial, facial and dental development.
Morphology of Australopithecus anamensis from Kanapoi and Allia Bay, Kenya.
TLDR
Based on the limited postcranial evidence available, A. anamensis appears to have been habitually bipedal, although it retained some primitive features of its upper limbs, and there appears to be no autapomorphies precluding A.Anamensis from ancestry of A. afarensis.
Homo floresiensis: a cladistic analysis.
Homoplasy and the early hominid masticatory system: inferences from analyses of extant hominoids and papionins.
TLDR
This finding challenges the recent suggestion that Paranthropus is polyphyletic, which is based on the assumption that masticatory characters are especially prone to homoplasy and suggests that H. rudolfensis is unlikely to be a member of the Homo clade and should therefore be allocated to another genus.
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