A reappraisal of caloric requirements in healthy women.

@article{Owen1986ARO,
  title={A reappraisal of caloric requirements in healthy women.},
  author={Oliver E. Owen and E C Kavle and R S Owen and Marilyn M. Polansky and Sonia Caprio and Maria Mozzoli and Zebulon V. Kendrick and M C Bushman and Guenther H. Boden},
  journal={The American journal of clinical nutrition},
  year={1986},
  volume={44 1},
  pages={
          1-19
        }
}
The caloric expenditure of 44 healthy, lean and obese women, 8 of whom were trained athletes, was measured by indirect calorimetry. Body composition was determined. Ages ranged from 18-65 yr and body weights from 43-143 kg. Stepwise, multiple-regression analysis was used to determine whether one or several variables best predicted the resting metabolic rate (RMR) of the women. The RMR and the thermic effect of food (TEF) were measured before and after the women consumed a mixed breakfast meal… Expand
A reappraisal of the caloric requirements of men.
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  • O. Owen
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  • Mayo Clinic proceedings
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TLDR
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These predictive equations were tested in a second, independent cohort of children and were found to give a reliable estimate of RMR in 10- to 16-year-old obese and nonobese adolescents. Expand
Predicted and measured resting metabolic rate in young, non-obese women.
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The Harris-Benedict for mula provides a valid estimation of RMR at the group level in a range of normal-weight to morbidly obese Iranians, however, at the individual level, errors might be so high that using a measured value has to be preferred over an estimated value. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Resting energy expenditure in obese women: comparison between measured and estimated values
TLDR
A wide variation in the accuracy of REE predictive equations before and after weight loss in non-morbid, obese women is demonstrated and the need to critically re-assess REE data and generate regional and more homogeneous REE databases for the target population is reinforced. Expand
Poor prediction of resting energy expenditure in obese women by established equations.
TLDR
Calculating REE by standard prediction equations does not represent a reliable alternative to indirect calorimetry for the assessment of REE in obese women and equations that include body composition parameters as assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis do not increase the accuracy of prediction. Expand
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