A real-time fast radio burst: polarization detection and multiwavelength follow-up

@article{Petroff2015ARF,
  title={A real-time fast radio burst: polarization detection and multiwavelength follow-up},
  author={Emily Petroff and Matthew Bailes and Ewan D. Barr and Benjamin R. Barsdell and N. D. Ramesh Bhat and Fuyan Bian and Sarah Burke-Spolaor and Manisha Caleb and David J. Champion and Poonam Chandra and Gary Da Costa and Corentin Delvaux and Chris Flynn and N. C. Gehrels and Jochen Greiner and Andrew Jameson and Simon Johnston and Mansi M. Kasliwal and Evan F. Keane and Stefan C. Keller and Jonathon Kocz and Michael Kramer and Giorgos Leloudas and Daniele B. Malesani and John S. Mulchaey and Cherry Ng and Eran. O. Ofek and Daniel A. Perley and Andrea Possenti and Brian P. Schmidt and Yue Shen and Ben W. Stappers and Patrick Tisserand and Willem van Straten and Christian Wolf},
  journal={Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society},
  year={2015},
  volume={447},
  pages={246-255}
}
Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are one of the most tantalizing mysteries of the radio sky; their progenitors and origins remain unknown and until now no rapid multiwavelength follow-up of an FRB has been possible. New instrumentation has decreased the time between observation and discovery from years to seconds, and enables polarimetry to be performed on FRBs for thefirst time. We have discovered an FRB (FRB 140514) in real-time on 2014 May 14 at 17:14:11.06… 

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