A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of natalizumab for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

@article{Polman2006ARP,
  title={A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of natalizumab for relapsing multiple sclerosis.},
  author={Chris H. Polman and P. W. O'Connor and Eva Kubala Havrdov{\'a} and M. Hutchinson and Ludwig Kappos and David H. Miller and J. Theodore Phillips and Fred D. Lublin and Gavin Giovannoni and Andrzej Wajgt and Martin J Toal and Frances Lynn and Michael A. Panzara and Alfred W. Sandrock},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2006},
  volume={354 9},
  pages={
          899-910
        }
}
BACKGROUND Natalizumab is the first alpha4 integrin antagonist in a new class of selective adhesion-molecule inhibitors. We report the results of a two-year phase 3 trial of natalizumab in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. METHODS Of a total of 942 patients, 627 were randomly assigned to receive natalizumab (at a dose of 300 mg) and 315 to receive placebo by intravenous infusion every four weeks for more than two years. The primary end points were the rate of clinical relapse at one… 

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...

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