A qualitative proteome investigation of the sediment portion of human urine: Implications in the biomarker discovery process.

Abstract

Inherent to the biomarker discovery process is a comparative analysis of physiological states. It is therefore critical that the proteome detection protocol does not bias the analysis. With urine, the sediment portion, obtained upon thawing frozen urine, is routinely discarded prior to proteome analysis. However, our results demonstrate that such a practice inadvertently induces bias, having significant implications in the biomarker discovery process. We present the first proteome investigation of human urinary sediments, identifying 60 proteins in this phase by MS. Many sediment proteins were also detected in the urinary supernatant, indicating that several proteins partition between the two phases. This partitioning is dependant on the pH of the sample, as well as the degree of sample agitation. As a consequence of discarding the sediment portion of urine, the concentration of potential candidate biomarkers in the supernatant phase will be altered or, in other instances, may be completely removed from the sample. To minimize this, the pH of all samples should first be normalized, and the samples vigorously vortexed prior to discarding the sediments. For more comprehensive biomarker investigations, we suggest that urinary sediments be analyzed along with the supernatant proteins.

DOI: 10.1002/prca.200800019

Cite this paper

@article{MataijaBotelho2009AQP, title={A qualitative proteome investigation of the sediment portion of human urine: Implications in the biomarker discovery process.}, author={Diane Mataija-Botelho and Patrick C Murphy and Devanand M. Pinto and Dawn L Maclellan and Chantale Langlois and Alan A Doucette}, journal={Proteomics. Clinical applications}, year={2009}, volume={3 1}, pages={95-105} }