A qualitative exploration of cervical and breast cancer stigma in Karnataka, India

@article{Nyblade2017AQE,
  title={A qualitative exploration of cervical and breast cancer stigma in Karnataka, India},
  author={Laura Nyblade and Melissa A. Stockton and Sandra Mary Travasso and Suneeta Krishnan},
  journal={BMC Women's Health},
  year={2017},
  volume={17}
}
BackgroundBreast and cervical cancer are two of the most common cancers among women worldwide and were the two leading causes of cancer related death for women in India in 2013. While it is recognized that psychosocial and cultural factors influence access to education, prevention, screening and treatment, the role of stigma related to these two cancers has received limited attention.MethodsTwo qualitative exploratory studies. One focusing on cervical cancer, the other on breast cancer, were… 
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