A protective effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 against eczema in the first 2 years of life persists to age 4 years

@article{Wickens2012APE,
  title={A protective effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 against eczema in the first 2 years of life persists to age 4 years},
  author={Kristin Wickens and Peter Nigel Black and Thorsten Stanley and Edwin A Mitchell and Christine Barthow and Penny Fitzharris and Gordon L. Purdie and Julian Crane},
  journal={Clinical \& Experimental Allergy},
  year={2012},
  volume={42}
}
BACKGROUND Using a double blind randomized placebo-controlled trial (Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12607000518460), we have shown that in a high risk birth cohort, maternal supplementation from 35 weeks gestation until 6 months if breastfeeding and infant supplementation until 2 years with Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (HN001) (6 × 10(9) cfu/day) halved the cumulative prevalence of eczema by age 2 years. [...] Key MethodMETHODS The presence (UK Working Party's Diagnostic Criteria) and…Expand
Early supplementation with Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 reduces eczema prevalence to 6 years: does it also reduce atopic sensitization?
  • K. Wickens, T. Stanley, +6 authors J. Crane
  • Medicine
  • Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology
  • 2013
TLDR
In a high‐risk birth cohort, maternal supplementation from 35 weeks gestation until 6 months if breastfeeding and infant supplementation from birth until 2 years with Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (HN001) halved the cumulative prevalence of eczema at 2 and 4 years. Expand
Effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 in early life on the cumulative prevalence of allergic disease to 11 years
  • K. Wickens, C. Barthow, +7 authors J. Crane
  • Medicine
  • Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
  • 2018
TLDR
It was shown that HN001 significantly protected against eczema development at 2, 4 and 6 years and atopic sensitization at 6 years, and there was no effect of HN019. Expand
Maternal supplementation alone with Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 during pregnancy and breastfeeding does not reduce infant eczema
  • K. Wickens, C. Barthow, +15 authors J. Crane
  • Medicine
  • Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
  • 2018
TLDR
This study aimed to test whether maternal supplementation alone is sufficient to reduce eczema and compare this to the previous study when both the mother and their child were supplemented. Expand
Differential modification of genetic susceptibility to childhood eczema by two probiotics
  • A. R. Morgan, D. Y. Han, +6 authors L. Ferguson
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology
  • 2014
In a double‐blind, randomized, placebo‐controlled birth cohort, we have recently shown a beneficial effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (HN001) for the prevention of eczema in children through toExpand
Differential effects of two probiotics on the risks of eczema and atopy associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms to Toll‐like receptors
  • G. Marlow, D. Han, +8 authors A. Morgan
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
  • 2015
TLDR
Two probiotics are investigated to investigate whether two probiotics can modify the known genetic predisposition to eczema conferred by genetic variation in the Toll‐like receptor (TLR) genes in a high‐risk infant population. Expand
Comparative probiotic strain efficacy in the prevention of eczema in infants and children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
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The use of probiotic supplements during pregnancy and/or during infancy creates a statistically significant decline in the incidence of eczema. Expand
Perinatal probiotic supplementation in the prevention of allergy related disease: 6 year follow up of a randomised controlled trial
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Maternal probiotic ingestion alone may be sufficient for long term reduction in the cumulative incidence of AD, but not other allergy related diseases. Expand
Probiotics and prebiotics in preventing food allergy and eczema
  • M. Kuitunen
  • Medicine
  • Current opinion in allergy and clinical immunology
  • 2013
TLDR
Prevention of eczema with probiotics seem to work until age 2 years and extended effects until 4 years have been shown in high-risk for allergy cohorts, with L. rhamnosus showing the most consistent effects especially when combining pre and postnatal administration. Expand
Supplementation with Probiotics in the First 6 Months of Life Did Not Protect against Eczema and Allergy in At-Risk Asian Infants: A 5-Year Follow-Up
TLDR
Early-life supplementation with probiotics did not change allergic outcomes at 5 years of age and the supplementation of probiotics in early childhood did not play a role in the prevention of allergic diseases. Expand
Probiotics in late infancy reduce the incidence of eczema: A randomized controlled trial
TLDR
This work aimed to examine the effect of a combination of two probiotic strains administered in late infancy and early childhood on the development of allergic diseases and sensitization. Expand
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