A prospective study of short- and long-term outcomes after traumatic brain injury in children: behavior and achievement.

@article{Taylor2002APS,
  title={A prospective study of short- and long-term outcomes after traumatic brain injury in children: behavior and achievement.},
  author={H. Gerry Taylor and Keith Owen Yeates and Shari L. Wade and Dennis D. Drotar and Terry Stancin and Nori Mercuri Minich},
  journal={Neuropsychology},
  year={2002},
  volume={16 1},
  pages={
          15-27
        }
}
Longitudinal behavior and achievement outcomes of traumatic brain injury (TBI) were investigated in 53 children with severe TBI, 56 children with moderate TBI, and 80 children with orthopedic injuries not involving brain insult. Measures of preinjury child and family status and of postinjury achievement skills were administered shortly after injury. Assessments were repeated 3 times across a mean follow-up interval of 4 years. Results from mixed model analysis revealed persisting sequelae of… 

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