A prospective study of handcuff neuropathies

@article{Grant2000APS,
  title={A prospective study of handcuff neuropathies},
  author={Arthur C. Grant and Albert A. Cook},
  journal={Muscle \& Nerve},
  year={2000},
  volume={23}
}
Prior reports of handcuff‐related neuropathies have been retrospective or small series of cases selected for their unusual electrophysiological or historical features. We conducted a prospective 27‐month study at a large, urban, teaching hospital of all patients with a complaint of hand numbness, weakness, or paresthesias attributed to overtightened handcuffs. Forty‐one patients were evaluated clinically, and electrodiagnostic testing was performed on 18. In the group with electrodiagnostic… 

Focal neurological complications of handcuff application.

TLDR
A long duration of handcuff application and, possibly, the existence of somnolence or acute alcohol intoxication could be predisposing factors to handcuff neuropathy.

Anatomical, clinical, and electrodiagnostic features of radial neuropathies.

Superficial radial neuropathy: an unobserved etiology of chronic dorsoradial wrist pain

  • E. Saba
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation
  • 2021
TLDR
Superficial radial neuropathy is common among patients with chronic dorsoradial wrist pain and should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

Bilateral isolated cut of sensory branch of radial nerve.

TLDR
The patient sought additional care after a month because of lingering numbness and pain, and surgery was planned, and scar tissue and neuroma at the cut ends of SBRN were excised, and bilateral S BRN cuts were repaired.

Compression and entrapment neuropathies.

  • P. Bouche
  • Medicine, Biology
    Handbook of clinical neurology
  • 2013

Compressive Neuropathies of the Radial Nerve

Compressive neuropathies of the radial nerve are less common than those of the median and ulnar nerves. The annual incidence of all radial nerve entrapments combined is approximately 0.003 % [1].

Entrapment Neuropathies of the Upper Extremity.

High‐resolution sonography of the superficial radial nerve with two case reports

TLDR
The purpose of this study was to find out whether high‐resolution sonography can be used to examine the superficial radial nerve and whether two patients with a superficial radial neuropathy and abnormal high‐ resolution sonography are reported.

Radial sinir duyusal dalının iki taraflı izole kesisi

TLDR
The patient sought additional care after a month because of lingering numbness and pain, and surgery was planned, and scar tissue and neuroma at the cut ends of SBRN were excised, and bilateral S BRN cuts were repaired.

A case report of surgical treatment of traumatic drop hand by quadruple tendons transfer

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 13 REFERENCES

Handcuff neuropathy: two unusual cases.

TLDR
Two cases of bilateral handcuff neuropathy involving multiple nerves were confirmed by electrodiagnostic findings of membrane instability, prolonged latencies and/or conduction block, and one case involved the median nerves, and a second case the ulnar nerves.

Handcuff neuropathy revisited

TLDR
Two unusual cases are presented in which the ulnar nerves were affected, but the radial nerves were normal or only minimally affected, which serves to emphasize a broader clinical spectrum of handcuff injury.

Injuries caused by handcuffs.

4 observations de lesions nerveuses (deficit sensoriel mais non moteur, et douleurs) dues a des traumatismes par menottes. Dans 2 cas l'apophyse styloide du radius est fracturee

Handcuff neuropathy among U.S. prisoners of war from Operation Desert Storm.

TLDR
Handcuff neuropathy was the most common neurologic problem acquired by U.S. prisoners of war during Operation Desert Storm and began to resolve shortly after their release from captivity.

Handcuffs and cheiralgia paresthetica

TLDR
This work presents two cases that occurred secondary to handcuff placement that have been reported in the past, but the exact etiology is unknown.

Correctional Health Care: A Public Health Opportunity

TLDR
The effects in U.S. prisons and jails of several communicable diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, hepatitis B virus infection, syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydial infection are reviewed.

Penetrating head injury.