A progenitor for the extremely luminous Type Ic supernova 2007bi

@article{Yoshida2011APF,
  title={A progenitor for the extremely luminous Type Ic supernova 2007bi},
  author={Takashi Yoshida and Hideyuki Umeda},
  journal={Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters},
  year={2011},
  volume={412},
  pages={78-82}
}
SN 2007bi is an extremely luminous Type Ic supernova. This supernova is thought to be evolved from a very massive star, and two possibilities have been proposed for the explosion mechanism. One possibility is a pair-instability supernova with an MCO ∼ 100 MCO core progenitor. Another possibility is a core-collapse supernova with MCO ∼ 40 M� .W e investigate the evolution of very massive stars with main-sequence mass MMS = 100-500 M� and Z0 = 0.004, which is in the metallicity range of the host… 

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