A prescription for lifestyle change in patients with hyperuricemia and gout

@article{Choi2010APF,
  title={A prescription for lifestyle change in patients with hyperuricemia and gout},
  author={Hyon K. Choi},
  journal={Current Opinion in Rheumatology},
  year={2010},
  volume={22},
  pages={165–172}
}
  • Hyon K. Choi
  • Published 1 March 2010
  • Medicine
  • Current Opinion in Rheumatology
Purpose of reviewThis review summarizes the recent data on lifestyle factors that influence serum uric acid levels and the risk of gout and attempts to provide holistic recommendations, considering both their impact on gout as well as on other health implications. Recent findingsLarge-scale studies have clarified a number of long-suspected relations between lifestyle factors, hyperuricemia, and gout, including purine-rich foods, dairy foods, various beverages, fructose, and vitamin C… 
Dietary Interventions for Gout and Effect on Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Systematic Review
TLDR
Mediterranean-style diets/DASH (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension) have shown to be effective for the reduction of cardiovascular risk factors in other at-risk populations, and it is recommended further investigation of such diets for the treatment of gout.
[Nutritional therapy of gout].
TLDR
The treatment of gout is multi-faceted, since this patient population presents other comorbidities such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and hypertension, which require a treatment strategy that is centered on modifying one's nutrition and nutritional behaviours.
The interplay between diet, urate transporters and the risk for gout and hyperuricemia: current and future directions
TLDR
The influence of dietary factors on serum uric acid levels and risk of gout, as well as the role of urate transporters in the development of hyperuricemia and gout are reviewed.
The epidemiology of uric acid and fructose.
Dietary intake and the risk of hyperuricemia, gout and chronic kidney disease in elderly Taiwanese men
  • Wan-Chi Chang
  • Medicine
    The aging male : the official journal of the International Society for the Study of the Aging Male
  • 2011
TLDR
Men who use anti-hypertensive drugs and who consume fewer soy products and more shellfish may be at a higher risk of developing hyperuricemia or CKD.
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TLDR
Well-controlled intervention studies in patients with gout are now needed to determine the clinical relevance of observations made in cross-sectional and short-term intervention studies, in order to guide dietary recommendations for this disease.
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TLDR
The adoption of more healthier dietary habits may contribute to better management of uricemia and also to a reduction of associated diseases.
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TLDR
The associations between vitamin C, dietary fiber and alcohol intakes and hyperuricemia in men support the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-based approach and attention to alcohol intake for managing hyperuricaemia in Korean men.
Lifestyle and dietary habits of patients with gout followed in rheumatology settings.
TLDR
Gouty patients' lifestyle is still partially different from the recommended, with a higher prevalence of obesity and a higher consumption of wine, but a similar intake of other tested dietary factors.
New and improved strategies for the treatment of gout
TLDR
In this century, gout is increasing in prevalence despite an increased understanding of its risk factors and pathophysiology, and the availability of reasonably effective treatment, which offer a better quality of life for gout sufferers.
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TLDR
Lifestyle modifications that are recommended for gout generally align with those for major chronic disorders (such as the insulin resistance syndrome, hypertension, and cardiovascular disorders); thus, these measures may be doubly beneficial for many patients with gout and particularly for individuals with these comorbid conditions.
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TLDR
Dietary and lifestyle recommendations related to gout should consider their effect on many diseases beyond gout, and should reinforce established recommendations where the influence on gout parallels the impact on other diseases, and consider modifying the recommendations where they are divergent.
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