A prequel to the Dantean Anomaly: the precipitation seesaw and droughts of 1302 to 1307 in Europe

@article{Bauch2020APT,
  title={A prequel to the Dantean Anomaly: the precipitation seesaw and droughts of 1302 to 1307 in Europe},
  author={Martin Bauch and Thomas Labb{\'e} and Annabell Engel and Patric Seifert},
  journal={Climate of the Past},
  year={2020}
}
Abstract. The cold/wet anomaly of the 1310s (“Dantean Anomaly”) has attracted a lot of attention from scholars, as it is commonly interpreted as a signal of the transition between the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the Little Ice Age (LIA). The huge variability that can be observed during this decade, like the high interannual variability observed in the 1340s, has been highlighted as a side effect of this rapid climatic transition. In this paper, we demonstrate that a multi-seasonal… 

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