A phylogenetic approach to test for evidence of parental conflict or gene duplications associated with protein-encoding imprinted orthologous genes in placental mammals

@article{OConnell2010APA,
  title={A phylogenetic approach to test for evidence of parental conflict or gene duplications associated with protein-encoding imprinted orthologous genes in placental mammals},
  author={Mary J. O’Connell and Noeleen Loughran and Thomas A. Walsh and Mark T.A. Donoghue and Karl J. Schmid and Charles Spillane},
  journal={Mammalian Genome},
  year={2010},
  volume={21},
  pages={486-498}
}
There are multiple theories on the evolution of genomic imprinting. We investigated whether the molecular evolution of true orthologs of known imprinted genes provides support for theories based on gene duplication or parental conflicts (where mediated by amino-acid changes). Our analysis of 34 orthologous genes demonstrates that the vast majority of mammalian imprinted genes have not undergone any subsequent significant gene duplication within placental species, suggesting that selection… 
Importance of Gene Duplication in the Evolution of Genomic Imprinting Revealed by Molecular Evolutionary Analysis of the Type I MADS-Box Gene Family in Arabidopsis Species
TLDR
This study investigated the evolutionary changes of type I MADS-box genes that include imprinted genes by using relative species of Arabidopsis thaliana and found an increased number of gene duplications within species in clades containing the imprinting genes, further supporting the hypothesis that local gene duplication is one of the driving forces for the formation of imprinting.
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Title Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-originspecific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds
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TLDR
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TLDR
Novel associations between six validated single nucleotide polymorphisms spanning a 97.6 kb region within the bovine guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gs subunit alpha gene (GNAS) domain suggest that GNAS domain-associated polymorphisms may serve as important genetic markers for future livestock breeding programs and support previous studies that candidate imprinti may act as molecular targets for the genetic improvement of agricultural populations.
Evolution, function, and regulation of genomic imprinting in plant seed development.
TLDR
Imprinted expression of a number of genes is conserved between monocots and dicots, suggesting that long-term selection can maintain imprinted expression at some loci.
Imprinted loci in domestic livestock species as epigenomic targets for artificial selection of complex traits.
TLDR
Current scientific knowledge regarding genomic imprinting in livestock species is reviewed and how this information can be used in modern livestock improvement programmes is evaluated.
Different yet similar: evolution of imprinting in flowering plants and mammals
TLDR
In mammals, imprinted genes are organized mainly in highly conserved clusters, whereas in plants they occur in isolation throughout the genome and are affected by local gene duplications, which reflects the distinct life cycles and the different evolutionary dynamics that shape plant and animal genomes.
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