A phylogenetic analysis of New Zealand giant and tree weta (Orthoptera : Anostostomatidae : Deinacrida and Hemideina) using morphological and genetic characters

@article{MorganRichards2001APA,
  title={A phylogenetic analysis of New Zealand giant and tree weta (Orthoptera : Anostostomatidae : Deinacrida and Hemideina) using morphological and genetic characters},
  author={Mary Morgan‐Richards and George W. Gibbs},
  journal={Invertebrate Systematics},
  year={2001},
  volume={15},
  pages={1-12}
}
A phylogenetic analysis of New Zealand weta from the sub-family Deinacridinae is presented. Eighteen species were studied using 27 genetic characters (allozyme and cytogenetic) and 25 morphological characters. The combined data set produced a phylogenetic hypothesis with twelve well-supported nodes. Despite the great diversity of habitats and life styles exhibited by the eleven Deinacrida White species a well-supported bipartition separates them from the seven Hemideina Walker species. Six of… Expand

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