A penguin-chewing louse (Insecta : Phthiraptera) phylogeny derived from morphology

@article{Banks2004APL,
  title={A penguin-chewing louse (Insecta : Phthiraptera) phylogeny derived from morphology},
  author={Jonathan C. Banks and Adrian M. Paterson},
  journal={Invertebrate Systematics},
  year={2004},
  volume={18},
  pages={89-100}
}
Penguins are parasitised by 15 species of lice in the genera Austrogoniodes and Nesiotinus and present an opportunity to analyse phylogenetic relationships of two complete genera of chewing lice parasitising a monophyletic group of hosts. Taxonomy of penguin lice has been revised several times, including the erection of the genus Cesareus to contain some of the penguin-chewing louse species. Additionally, other groups of species within Austrogoniodes have been proposed. We constructed a… 
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