A pattern of verbal irony in Chinookan

@article{Hymes1987APO,
  title={A pattern of verbal irony in Chinookan},
  author={Dell H. Hymes},
  journal={International Journal of the Sociology of Language},
  year={1987},
  volume={1987},
  pages={110 - 97}
}
  • D. Hymes
  • Published 1987
  • Linguistics
  • International Journal of the Sociology of Language
Humor is an essential aspect of American Indian narratives, yet many of the analyses and explanations of myths and tales forget that one reason the stories were told and preserved is that people enjoy them so much. Vi Hilbert, an elder of the Lushootseed-speaking people of Washington, has reminded others of the need to pay attention to such humor (1983). In this paper I will examine two Chinookan narratives in order to explore a Chinookan pattern, one whose discovery sheds light both on these… 
"The Validity of Navajo Is in Its Sounds": On Hymes, Navajo Poetry, Punning, and the Recognition of Voice
Inspired by Dell Hymes's ethnopoetic analysis of expressive and presentational features, this article takes as its point of departure a poem written in Navajo by contemporary Navajo poet Rex Lee Jim;
Blackhorse Mitchell's Beauty of Navajoland: Bivalency, Dooajinída, and the work of contemporary Navajo poetry
Why do some Navajo poets write poetry that describes “ugliness” on the Navajo Nation and what do they believe they are doing by writing that poetry? I examine those questions by focusing on
Irony

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