A novel free-living prochlorophyte abundant in the oceanic euphotic zone

@article{Chisholm1988ANF,
  title={A novel free-living prochlorophyte abundant in the oceanic euphotic zone},
  author={Sallie W. Chisholm and Robert J. Olson and Erik R. Zettler and Ralf Goericke and John B. Waterbury and Nicholas A. Welschmeyer},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1988},
  volume={334},
  pages={340-343}
}
The recent discovery of photosynthetic picoplankton has changed our understanding of marine food webs1. Both prokaryotic2,3 and eukaryotic4,5 species occur in most of the world's oceans and account for a significant proportion of global productivity6. Using shipboard flow cytometry, we have identified a new group of picoplankters which are extremely abundant, and barely visible using traditional microscopic techniques. These cells are smaller than the coccoid cyanobacteria and reach… Expand
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