A novel amniote model of epimorphic regeneration: the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius

@article{McLean2011ANA,
  title={A novel amniote model of epimorphic regeneration: the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius},
  author={K. McLean and M. Vickaryous},
  journal={BMC Developmental Biology},
  year={2011},
  volume={11},
  pages={50 - 50}
}
BackgroundEpimorphic regeneration results in the restoration of lost tissues and structures from an aggregation of proliferating cells known as a blastema. Among amniotes the most striking example of epimorphic regeneration comes from tail regenerating lizards. Although tail regeneration is often studied in the context of ecological costs and benefits, details of the sequence of tissue-level events are lacking. Here we investigate the anatomical and histological events that characterize tail… Expand
The regeneration blastema of lizards: an amniote model for the study of appendage replacement
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It is demonstrated that the gecko tail blastema is not an avascular structure, and it is predicted that variation in the neovascular response observed between different regeneration‐competent species likely relates to the volume of the blastema. Expand
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Wound healing as a component of epimorphic regeneration and the role of the immune system in this process are discussed and combinations of these mechanisms are suggested. Expand
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TLDR
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Neural stem/progenitor cells are activated during tail regeneration in the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius)
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TLDR
The anatomy and histology of caudal autotomy and regeneration in lizards is reviewed, drawing heavily from research published over the past 2 decades. Expand
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Combined, these observations provide strong support for the importance of different TGFβ ligands during multi‐tissue regeneration and the potential role of TGF β/activin‐induced EMT programs during this process. Expand
Spinal Cord Regeneration in the Leopard Gecko (Eublepharis macularius): Investigating the Stemness, Activation and Heterogeneity of Ependymal Layer Cells
TLDR
It is determined that ELCs are activated in response to injury, as evidenced by changes in proliferation and protein expression, which contribute to the fully regenerated spinal cord. Expand
Spinal cord self-repair during tail regeneration in Polypedates maculatus and putative role of FGF1 as a neurotrophic factor
TLDR
During the course of spinal cord regeneration in the regenerating tail, melanocytes showed an interesting behaviour as these neural crest derivatives were missing near the early regenerates until their reappearance where they were positioned in close proximity with the regenerated spinal cord as in the normal tail. Expand
Tail regeneration and other phenomena of wound healing and tissue restoration in lizards
TLDR
How lizards can inform, enhance and expand the understanding of the biology of regeneration is highlighted, with a focus on lizards as an emerging model. Expand
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