A note on theory and practice in rhetorical criticism

@article{Black1980ANO,
  title={A note on theory and practice in rhetorical criticism},
  author={Edwin Black},
  journal={Western Journal of Speech Communication},
  year={1980},
  volume={44},
  pages={331-336}
}
  • Edwin Black
  • Published 30 December 1980
  • Art
  • Western Journal of Speech Communication
Ihe subject of theory and practice mandates attention to the "problem of mediation," to the intersections between thought and action, idea and will, conception and execution. One cannot deal cohesively with the relationship between theory and practice without focusing on the psychological process of criticism, on the critic's own motives, means and ends, on his relationships with his characteristic perspectives on the one hand, and with the critical object on the other. Hence, these… 
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