A nonverbal false belief task: the performance of children and great apes.

@article{Call1999ANF,
  title={A nonverbal false belief task: the performance of children and great apes.},
  author={Josep Call and Michael Tomasello},
  journal={Child development},
  year={1999},
  volume={70 2},
  pages={381-95}
}
A nonverbal task of false belief understanding was given to 4- and 5-year-old children (N = 28) and to two species of great ape: chimpanzees and orangutans (N = 7). The task was embedded in a series of finding games in which an adult (the hider) hid a reward in one of two identical containers, and another adult (the communicator) observed the hiding process and attempted to help the participant by placing a marker on the container that she believed to hold the reward. An initial series of… CONTINUE READING

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