A non-reward attractor theory of depression

@article{Rolls2016ANA,
  title={A non-reward attractor theory of depression},
  author={Edmund T. Rolls},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2016},
  volume={68},
  pages={47-58}
}
  • E. Rolls
  • Published 1 September 2016
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews

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