A newly discovered founder population: the Roma/Gypsies.

@article{Kalaydjieva2005AND,
  title={A newly discovered founder population: the Roma/Gypsies.},
  author={Luba V Kalaydjieva and Bharti Morar and Rapha{\"e}lle Chaix and Hua Tang},
  journal={BioEssays : news and reviews in molecular, cellular and developmental biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={27 10},
  pages={
          1084-94
        }
}
  • L. Kalaydjieva, B. Morar, +1 author Hua Tang
  • Published 1 October 2005
  • Biology, Medicine
  • BioEssays : news and reviews in molecular, cellular and developmental biology
The Gypsies (a misnomer, derived from an early legend about Egyptian origins) defy the conventional definition of a population: they have no nation-state, speak different languages, belong to many religions and comprise a mosaic of socially and culturally divergent groups separated by strict rules of endogamy. Referred to as "the invisible minority", the Gypsies have for centuries been ignored by Western medicine, and their genetic heritage has only recently attracted attention. Common origins… 
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