A new workerless social parasite in the ant genus Pseudomyrmex (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), with a discussion of the origin of social parasitism in ants

@article{Ward1996ANW,
  title={A new workerless social parasite in the ant genus Pseudomyrmex (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), with a discussion of the origin of social parasitism in ants},
  author={Sj Ward},
  journal={Systematic Entomology},
  year={1996},
  volume={21}
}
  • S. Ward
  • Published 1 July 1996
  • Biology
  • Systematic Entomology
The New World ant genus Pseudomyrmex (subfamily Pseudomyrmecinae) contains about 180 species, of which only one workerless social parasite, P.leptosus, from Florida, has been previously recorded. A new species discovered recently in northern Argentina, P.inquilinus sp. nov., is more derived morphologically and behaviourally than P.leptosus and has convergently developed features characteristic of the workerless inquilines known in other ant subfamilies. These features include diminutive size… 

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