A new type of glutamate receptor linked to inositol phospholipid metabolism

@article{Sugiyama1987ANT,
  title={A new type of glutamate receptor linked to inositol phospholipid metabolism},
  author={Hiroyuki Sugiyama and Isao Ito and Chikara Hirono},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1987},
  volume={325},
  pages={531-533}
}
Receptors for excitatory amino acids in the mammalian central nervous system are classified into three major subtypes1,2, ones which prefer N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), quisqualate (QA), or kainate (KA) as type agonists respectively. These receptors are considered to mediate fast postsynaptic potentials by activating ion channels directly3–5 (ionotropic type6). Recently it was reported that exposure of mammalian brain cells to glutamate (Glu) or its analogues causes enhanced hydrolysis of… Expand
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