A new small-bodied hominin from the Late Pleistocene of Flores, Indonesia

@article{Brown2004ANS,
  title={A new small-bodied hominin from the Late Pleistocene of Flores, Indonesia},
  author={P. Brown and T. Sutikna and M. Morwood and R. Soejono and Jatmiko and E. W. Saptomo and R. A. Due},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2004},
  volume={431},
  pages={1055-1061}
}
Currently, it is widely accepted that only one hominin genus, Homo, was present in Pleistocene Asia, represented by two species, Homo erectus and Homo sapiens. Both species are characterized by greater brain size, increased body height and smaller teeth relative to Pliocene Australopithecus in Africa. Here we report the discovery, from the Late Pleistocene of Flores, Indonesia, of an adult hominin with stature and endocranial volume approximating 1 m and 380 cm3, respectively—equal to the… Expand
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