A new paravian dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of North America supports a late acquisition of avian flight

@article{Hartman2019ANP,
  title={A new paravian dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of North America supports a late acquisition of avian flight},
  author={Scott A Hartman and Mickey Mortimer and William R. Wahl and Dean R. Lomax and Jessica L. Lippincott and David M. Lovelace},
  journal={PeerJ},
  year={2019},
  volume={7}
}
The last two decades have seen a remarkable increase in the known diversity of basal avialans and their paravian relatives. The lack of resolution in the relationships of these groups combined with attributing the behavior of specialized taxa to the base of Paraves has clouded interpretations of the origin of avialan flight. Here, we describe Hesperornithoides miessleri gen. et sp. nov., a new paravian theropod from the Morrison Formation (Late Jurassic) of Wyoming, USA, represented by a single… 
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