A new method for estimating race/ethnicity and associated disparities where administrative records lack self-reported race/ethnicity.

@article{Elliott2008ANM,
  title={A new method for estimating race/ethnicity and associated disparities where administrative records lack self-reported race/ethnicity.},
  author={Marc N. Elliott and Allen M. Fremont and Peter A. Morrison and Philip M Pantoja and Nicole Lurie},
  journal={Health services research},
  year={2008},
  volume={43 5 Pt 1},
  pages={
          1722-36
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To efficiently estimate race/ethnicity using administrative records to facilitate health care organizations' efforts to address disparities when self-reported race/ethnicity data are unavailable. DATA SOURCE Surname, geocoded residential address, and self-reported race/ethnicity from 1,973,362 enrollees of a national health plan. STUDY DESIGN We compare the accuracy of a Bayesian approach to combining surname and geocoded information to estimate race/ethnicity to two other… Expand
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VERIFICATION OF FORECASTS EXPRESSED IN TERMS OF PROBABILITY