A new eocene Chascacocolius-like mousebird (Aves: Coliiformes) with a remarkable gaping adaptation

@article{Mayr2005ANE,
  title={A new eocene Chascacocolius-like mousebird (Aves: Coliiformes) with a remarkable gaping adaptation},
  author={Gerald Mayr},
  journal={Organisms Diversity \& Evolution},
  year={2005},
  volume={5},
  pages={167-171}
}
  • G. Mayr
  • Published 1 September 2005
  • Biology
  • Organisms Diversity & Evolution
Abstract A skull of a new species of mousebird (Aves: Coliiformes) is described from the Middle Eocene of Messel in Germany. Chascacocolius cacicirostris n. sp. is the fifth coliiform species described from the Messel deposits, and a further example of the remarkable similarity between the early Eocene avifaunas of North America and Europe. As for its much smaller North American counterpart, C. oscitans Houde & Olson, 1992, the new species has greatly elongated retroarticular processes on the… Expand

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