A new basal Carnivoramorphan (Mammalia) from the ‘Bridger B’ (Black’s Fork member, Bridger Formation, Bridgerian Nalma, middle Eocene) of Wyoming, USA

@article{Spaulding2010ANB,
  title={A new basal Carnivoramorphan (Mammalia) from the ‘Bridger B’ (Black’s Fork member, Bridger Formation, Bridgerian Nalma, middle Eocene) of Wyoming, USA},
  author={Michelle Spaulding and John J. Flynn and Richard K. Stucky},
  journal={Palaeontology},
  year={2010},
  volume={53},
  pages={815-832}
}
Abstract:  A new genus and species of basal non-Viverravidae Carnivoramorpha, Dawsonicyon isami, is named and described. This new taxon is based upon DMNH 19585, an almost complete skeleton, which was collected from the Black’s Fork Member (informal ‘Bridger B’ subunit) of the Bridger Formation in southwestern Wyoming, USA. The specimen is incorporated into an existing craniodental data matrix, and the associated phylogenetic analyses support the identification of this species as a new basal… Expand
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