A new Jurassic theropod from China documents a transitional step in the macrostructure of feathers

@article{Lefvre2017ANJ,
  title={A new Jurassic theropod from China documents a transitional step in the macrostructure of feathers},
  author={Ulysse Lef{\`e}vre and Andrea Cau and Aude Cincotta and Dongyu Hu and Anusuya Chinsamy and François Escuilli{\'e} and Pascal Godefroit},
  journal={The Science of Nature},
  year={2017},
  volume={104},
  pages={1-13}
}
Genuine fossils with exquisitely preserved plumage from the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous of northeastern China have recently revealed that bird-like theropod dinosaurs had long pennaceous feathers along their hindlimbs and may have used their four wings to glide or fly. Thus, it has been postulated that early bird flight might initially have involved four wings (Xu et al. Nature 421:335–340, 2003; Hu et al. Nature 461:640–643, 2009; Han et al. Nat Commun 5:4382, 2014). Here, we describe… 
A bony-crested Jurassic dinosaur with evidence of iridescent plumage highlights complexity in early paravian evolution
TLDR
A distinctive new Yanliao theropod species bearing prominent lacrimal crests, bony ornaments previously known from more basal theropods, and a suite of unusual skeletal and feather characteristics consistent with proposed rapid character evolution and significant diversity in signalling and locomotor strategies near bird origins.
A new paravian dinosaur from the Late Jurassic of North America supports a late acquisition of avian flight
TLDR
All parsimonious results support the hypothesis that each early paravian clade was plesiomorphically flightless, raising the possibility that avian flight originated as late as the Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous.
A non-archaeopterygid avialan theropod from the Late Jurassic of southern Germany
TLDR
A new, non-archaeopterygid avialan from the Lower Tithonian Mörnsheim Formation of the Solnhofen Archipelago, Alcmonavis poeschli gen. et sp.
Feather Evolution in Pennaraptora
TLDR
The origin and early evolution of complex feathers and flight abilities in paravian theropods were not linear processes, but more complex than previously thought.
A polar dinosaur feather assemblage from Australia
The rise of feathered dinosaurs: Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus, the oldest dinosaur with ‘feather-like’ structures
TLDR
The first dating of the Kulinda locality is presented, combining U-Pb analyses on detrital zircons and monazites from sedimentary rocks of volcaniclastic origin and palynological observations, which provide evidence of a Bathonian age for Kulindadromeus, the oldest known dinosaur with “feather-like” structures discovered so far.
Chapter 2 The fossil record of Mesozoic and Paleocene pennaraptorans
An unabated surge of new and important discoveries continues to transform knowledge of pennaraptoran biology and evolution amassed over the last 150+ years. This chapter summarizes progress made thus
The oldest Archaeopteryx (Theropoda: Avialiae): a new specimen from the Kimmeridgian/Tithonian boundary of Schamhaupten, Bavaria
TLDR
The iconic primeval bird Archaeopteryx was so far mainly known from the Altmühltal Formation of Bavaria, southern Germany, with one specimen having been found in the overlying Mörnsheim Formation, but a new specimen from the earliest Tithonian Painten Formation of Schamhaupten (Bavaria) represents the so far oldest representative of the genus.
Upper Cretaceous European theropod palaeobiodiversity, palaeobiogeography and the intra‐Maastrichtian faunal turnover: new contributions from the Iberian fossil site of Laño
A total of 227 theropod teeth have so far been recovered from the upper Campanian Laño site (northern Iberian Peninsula). The teeth were studied for their qualitative and quantitative features. From
The body plan of Halszkaraptor escuilliei (Dinosauria, Theropoda) is not a transitional form along the evolution of dromaeosaurid hypercarnivory
  • A. Cau
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    PeerJ
  • 2020
TLDR
The halszkaraptorine bauplan is confirmed as a derived amphibious specialization, and does not represent a “transitional” stage along the evolution of dromaeosaurids.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 118 REFERENCES
A pre-Archaeopteryx troodontid theropod from China with long feathers on the metatarsus
TLDR
The extensive feathering of this specimen, particularly the attachment of long pennaceous feathers to the pes, sheds new light on the early evolution of feathers and demonstrates the complex distribution of skeletal and integumentary features close to the dinosaur–bird transition.
A Basal Alvarezsauroid Theropod from the Early Late Jurassic of Xinjiang, China
TLDR
A more complete early specimen is described, dating to about 160 million years ago, which supports the conclusion that Alvarezsauroidea are a basal group of the clade containing both birds and their close theropod relatives and confirms that this group is a basal member of Maniraptora.
A Jurassic avialan dinosaur from China resolves the early phylogenetic history of birds
TLDR
The complete skeleton of a new paravian from the Tiaojishan Formation of Liaoning Province, China is described and including it in a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis for basal Paraves recovers Archaeopteryx as the basal-most avialan and implies that the early diversification of Paraves and Avialae took place in the Middle–Late Jurassic period.
A new maniraptoran dinosaur from China with long feathers on the metatarsus
TLDR
A new eumaniraptoran theropod from China, with avian affinities, is reported, which also has long pennaceous feathers on its feet, suggesting that such morphology might represent a primitive adaptation close to the theropOD–bird transition.
A bizarre Jurassic maniraptoran theropod with preserved evidence of membranous wings
TLDR
Documentation of the unique forelimbs of Yi greatly increases the morphological disparity known to exist among dinosaurs, and highlights the extraordinary breadth and richness of the evolutionary experimentation that took place close to the origin of birds.
Theropod Fauna from Southern Australia Indicates High Polar Diversity and Climate-Driven Dinosaur Provinciality
TLDR
Most dinosaur groups probably attained a near-cosmopolitan distribution in the Jurassic, prior to fragmentation of the Pangaean supercontinent, and some aspects of the hallmark ‘Gondwanan’ fauna of South America and Africa may therefore reflect climate-driven provinciality, not vicariant evolution driven by continental fragmentation.
Mosaic evolution in an asymmetrically feathered troodontid dinosaur with transitional features
TLDR
This report reports a new troodontid from the Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group of China that has anatomical features that are transitional between long-armed basal Troodontids and derived short-armed ones, shedding new light on troodonid character evolution and suggests that feather asymmetry was ancestral to Paraves.
New specimen of Archaeopteryx provides insights into the evolution of pennaceous feathers
TLDR
An analysis of the phylogenetic distribution of pennaceous feathers on the tail, hindlimb and arms of advanced maniraptorans and basal avialans strongly indicates that these structures evolved in a functional context other than flight, most probably in relation to display, as suggested by some previous studies.
A new long‐tailed basal bird from the Lower Cretaceous of north‐eastern China
TLDR
A revision of long-tailed birds from China and a phylogenetic analysis of basal Avialae suggest that Jeholornithiformes were paraphyletic, with Jixiangornis orientalis being the sister-taxon of pygostylia.
The theropod ancestry of birds: new evidence from the late cretaceous of madagascar
TLDR
Rahona has a robust, hyperextendible second digit on the hind foot that terminates in a sicklelike claw, a unique characteristic of the theropod groups Troodontidae and Dromaeosauridae.
...
...