A neuropsychological theory of motor skill learning.

@article{Willingham1998ANT,
  title={A neuropsychological theory of motor skill learning.},
  author={Daniel B. Willingham},
  journal={Psychological review},
  year={1998},
  volume={105 3},
  pages={
          558-84
        }
}
  • D. Willingham
  • Published 1 July 1998
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Psychological review
This article describes a neuropsychological theory of motor skill learning that is based on the idea that learning grows directly out of motor control processes. Three motor control processes may be tuned to specific tasks, thereby improving performance: selecting spatial targets for movement, sequencing these targets, and transforming them into muscle commands. These processes operate outside of awareness. A 4th, conscious process can improve performance in either of 2 ways: by selecting more… 

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