A narrative review of exercise‐associated muscle cramps: Factors that contribute to neuromuscular fatigue and management implications

@article{Nelson2016ANR,
  title={A narrative review of exercise‐associated muscle cramps: Factors that contribute to neuromuscular fatigue and management implications},
  author={Nicole L. Nelson and James R. Churilla},
  journal={Muscle \& Nerve},
  year={2016},
  volume={54}
}
Although exercise‐associated muscle cramps (EAMC) are highly prevalent among athletic populations, the etiology and most effective management strategies are still unclear. The aims of this narrative review are 3‐fold: (1) briefly summarize the evidence regarding EAMC etiology; (2) describe the risk factors and possible physiological mechanisms associated with neuromuscular fatigue and EAMC; and (3) report the current evidence regarding prevention of, and treatment for, EAMC. Based on the… 

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This case report illustrates, for the first time, how workload spikes, monitored with ACWR, preceded an extreme EAMC episode that was followed by an exacerbated muscle damage response.

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It was concluded that ingesting ORS appeared to be effective for preventing EAMC, and it was suggested that ORS intake during exercise decreased muscle cramp susceptibility.

Effect of oral rehydration solution versus spring water intake during exercise in the heat on muscle cramp susceptibility of young men

It was concluded that ingesting ORS appeared to be effective for preventing EAMC, and results suggest that ORS intake during exercise decreased muscle cramp susceptibility.

Muscle Cramping in the Marathon: Dehydration and Electrolyte Depletion vs. Muscle Damage

Runners who suffered EAMC did not exhibit a greater degree of dehydration and electrolyte depletion after the marathon but displayed significantly higher concentrations of muscle damage biomarkers.

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