A multivariate approach to infer locomotor modes in Mesozoic mammals

@inproceedings{Chen2015AMA,
  title={A multivariate approach to infer locomotor modes in Mesozoic mammals},
  author={Meng Chen and G P Wilson},
  booktitle={Paleobiology},
  year={2015}
}
Abstract. Ecomorphological diversity of Mesozoic mammals was presumably constrained by selective pressures imposed by contemporary vertebrates. In accordance, Mesozoic mammals for a long time had been viewed as generalized, terrestrial, small-bodied forms with limited locomotor specializations. Recent discoveries of Mesozoic mammal skeletons with distinctive postcranial morphologies have challenged this hypothesis. However, ecomorphological analyses of these new postcrania have focused on a… Expand
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