A multisensory investigation of the functional significance of the “pain matrix”

@article{Mouraux2011AMI,
  title={A multisensory investigation of the functional significance of the “pain matrix”},
  author={A. Mouraux and A. Diukova and Michael C. Lee and R. Wise and G. Iannetti},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2011},
  volume={54},
  pages={2237-2249}
}
Functional neuroimaging studies in humans have shown that nociceptive stimuli elicit activity in a wide network of cortical areas commonly labeled as the "pain matrix" and thought to be preferentially involved in the perception of pain. Despite the fact that this "pain matrix" has been used extensively to build models of where and how nociception is processed in the human brain, convincing experimental evidence demonstrating that this network is specifically related to nociception is lacking… Expand
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The original concept of the “Neuromatrix” as it was initially proposed by Melzack and its subsequent transformation into a pain-specific matrix is reviewed and it is shown that the fraction of the neuronal activity measured using currently available macroscopic functional neuroimaging techniques is likely to be largely unspecific for nociception. Expand
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