A morphological phylogeny for four families of amblyceran lice (Phthiraptera: Amblycera: Menoponidae, Boopiidae, Laemobothriidae, Ricinidae)

@article{Marshall2003AMP,
  title={A morphological phylogeny for four families of amblyceran lice (Phthiraptera: Amblycera: Menoponidae, Boopiidae, Laemobothriidae, Ricinidae)},
  author={Isabel K. Marshall},
  journal={Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society},
  year={2003},
  volume={138},
  pages={39-82}
}
The suborder Amblycera (Insecta: Phthiraptera) comprises seven recognized families of parasitic lice. Three of these families (the Menoponidae, Laemobothriidae and Ricinidae) are present on a wide range of avian hosts. The four remaining families are restricted to a small section of mammals (the Boopiidae are parasites of Australian and New Guinean marsupials, and the Gyropidae, Trimenoponidae and Abrocomophagidae parasitize South and Central American rodents). This study uses a morphological… 
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