A molecular timescale for vertebrate evolution

@article{Kumar1998AMT,
  title={A molecular timescale for vertebrate evolution},
  author={Sudhir Kumar and S. Blair Hedges},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1998},
  volume={392},
  pages={917-920}
}
A timescale is necessary for estimating rates of molecular and morphological change in organisms and for interpreting patterns of macroevolution and biogeography. Traditionally, these times have been obtained from the fossil record, where the earliest representatives of two lineages establish a minimum time of divergence of these lineages. The clock-like accumulation of sequence differences in some genes provides an alternative method by which the mean divergence time can be estimated… Expand
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