A molecular phylogeny and revised classification for the oldest ditrysian moth lineages (Lepidoptera: Tineoidea), with implications for ancestral feeding habits of the mega‐diverse Ditrysia

@article{Regier2015AMP,
  title={A molecular phylogeny and revised classification for the oldest ditrysian moth lineages (Lepidoptera: Tineoidea), with implications for ancestral feeding habits of the mega‐diverse Ditrysia},
  author={J. C. Regier and C. Mitter and D. Davis and T. Harrison and J. Sohn and M. P. Cummings and A. Zwick and Kim T. Mitter},
  journal={Systematic Entomology},
  year={2015},
  volume={40}
}
The Tineoidea are the earliest‐originating extant superfamily of the enormous clade Ditrysia, whose 152 000+ species make up 98% of the insect order Lepidoptera. Though more diverse than all non‐ditrysian superfamilies put together (3719 vs 2604 species), the tineoids are not especially species‐rich among ditrysian superfamilies. Their phylogenetic position, however, makes tineoids potentially important for understanding the causes of ditrysian hyperdiversity, through their effect on inferences… Expand
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