A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the "true thrushes" (Aves: Turdinae).

@article{Klicka2005AMP,
  title={A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the "true thrushes" (Aves: Turdinae).},
  author={John Klicka and Gary Voelker and Garth M. Spellman},
  journal={Molecular phylogenetics and evolution},
  year={2005},
  volume={34 3},
  pages={
          486-500
        }
}
The true thrushes (Passeriformes: Muscicapidae, subfamily Turdinae) are a speciose and widespread avian lineage presumed to be of Old World origin. Phylogenetic relationships within this assemblage were investigated using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data that included the cytochrome b and ND2 genes. Our ingroup sampling included 54 species representing 17 of 20 putative turdine genera. Phylogenetic trees derived via maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood were largely congruent. Most of… 
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