A modular technique for the design of efficient distributed leader finding algorithms

@inproceedings{Korach1990AMT,
  title={A modular technique for the design of efficient distributed leader finding algorithms},
  author={Ephraim Korach and Shay Kutten and Shlomo Moran},
  booktitle={TOPL},
  year={1990}
}
A general, modular technique for designing efficient leader finding algorithms in distributed, asynchronous networks is developed. This technique reduces the problem of efficient leader finding to a simpler problem of efficient serial traversing of the corresponding network. The message complexity of the resulting leader finding algorithms is bounded by [<italic>f</italic>(<italic>n</italic>) + <italic>n</italic>)(log<subscrpt>2</subscrpt><italic>k</italic> + 1) (or (<italic>f</italic>(<italic… 
Yet Another Modular Technique for Efficient Leader Election
TLDR
The approach can be viewed as a generalization of the previous method introduced by Korach, Kutten and Moran and can be used to design new linear leader election algorithms for unoriented butterflies and cube connected cycles, thus demonstrating its usefulness.
On the complexity of universal leader election
TLDR
The fundamental lower bounds of the message and time complexity of randomized implicit leader election in synchronous distributed networks are established, and several universal leader election algorithms with bounds that trade-off messages versus time are presented.
The complexity of leader election in diameter-two networks
TLDR
The results fully characterize the message complexity of leader election vis-à-vis the graph diameter and show that any algorithm (even Monte Carlo randomized algorithms with large enough constant success probability) needs Ω ( n) messages (even when n is known), regardless of the number of rounds.
The Complexity of Leader Election: A Chasm at Diameter Two
TLDR
The results show that leader election can be solved in diameter-two graphs in (essentially) linear (in n) message complexity and thus the Ω(m) lower bound does not apply to diameter- two graphs.
Sublinear Bounds for Randomized Leader Election
TLDR
An almost-tight lower bound is presented for randomized leader election, showing that \(\Omega(\sqrt n)\) messages are needed for any O(1) time leader election algorithm which succeeds with high probability, regardless of the number of the rounds.
A synod based deterministic and indulgent leader election protocol for asynchronous large groups
TLDR
Experimental results show that the deterministic and indulgent algorithm presented is faster to elect a leader than existing algorithms which are optimised for large-scale systems and performs better than the existing graph-based techniques employed in these systems.
Brief Announcement: On the Message Complexity of Fault-Tolerant Computation: Leader Election and Agreement
This paper investigates on the message complexity of the two fundamental problems, namely, leader election and agreement in the crash-fault synchronous and fully-connected distributed network. We
Self-stabilizing leader election for single-hop wireless networks despite jamming
TLDR
This paper presents Select, a leader election protocol for wireless networks where nodes communicate over a shared medium that is self-stabilizing in the sense that it converges to a correct solution from any possible initial network state.
Singularly Near Optimal Leader Election in Asynchronous Networks
TLDR
This result is the first known distributed leader election algorithm for asynchronous networks that is near optimal with respect to both time and message complexity and improves over a long line of results including the classical results of Gallager et al.
Deterministic Leader Election Takes $\Theta(D + \log n)$ Bit Rounds
TLDR
It is shown that the bit round complexity of \STT is optimal (up to a constant factor), which is a significant step forward in understanding the interplay between time and message optimality for the election problem.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 69 REFERENCES
Tight lower and upper bounds for some distributed algorithms for a complete network of processors
TLDR
One implication of the results is that finding a spanning tree in a complete network is easier than finding a minimum weight spanning Tree in such a network, which may require O(n)>(supscrpt>2</supsCrpt) messages.
Election and traversal in unidirectional networks
TLDR
This paper presents distributed algorithms for election and traversal in strongly connected unidirectional networks that achieves the same communication complexity and uses only 1 bits of memory in each processor.
Time and message bounds for election in synchronous and asynchronous complete networks
TLDR
A lower bound of 12(nlogn) on the message complexity is proven, and it is proven that any message-optimal synchronous algo- rithm requires 12(log n) time.
The impact of synchronous communication on the problem of electing a leader in a ring
TLDR
The problem of electing a leader in a synchronous ring of n processors is considered and it is shown that if processor ID's are chosen from some countable set, then there is an algorithm which uses only O(n) messages in the worst case.
Time and Message Bounds for Election in Synchronous and Asynchronous Complete Networks
TLDR
This paper addresses the problem of distributively electing a leader in both synchronous and asynchronous complete networks by proving a lower bound of $\Omega (n\log n)$ on the message complexity and proving that any message-optimal synchronous algorithm requires time.
A Fully Distributed (Minimal) Spanning Tree Algorithm
Selecting a leader in a clique in 0(N log N) messages
  • P. Humblet
  • Computer Science
    The 23rd IEEE Conference on Decision and Control
  • 1984
TLDR
An extremely simple algorithm for all processors in a completely connected network to agree on a unique leader requires O(N log K) messages, where N is the number of processors, and K is thenumber of processors that independently start the algorithm.
A Distributed Algorithm for Minimum-Weight Spanning Trees
TLDR
A distributed algorithm is presented that constructs the minimum weight spanning tree in a connected undirected graph with distinct edge weights that can be initiated spontaneously at any node or at any subset of nodes.
Distributed elections in an archimedean ring of processors
TLDR
The deterministic algorithm is of -asymptotically- optimal bit complexity, and, in the synchronous case, also yields an optimal method to determine the ring size, and the known nonlinear lower bound on the required number of message passes is cracked.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...