A modern human pattern of dental development in lower pleistocene hominids from Atapuerca-TD6 (Spain).

@article{BermdezdeCastro1999AMH,
  title={A modern human pattern of dental development in lower pleistocene hominids from Atapuerca-TD6 (Spain).},
  author={Jos{\'e} Mar{\'i}a Berm{\'u}dez de Castro and Antonio Rosas and Eudald Carbonell and Megan E Nicolas and J. Rodr{\'i}guez and Juan Luis Arsuaga},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1999},
  volume={96 7},
  pages={
          4210-3
        }
}
The study of life history evolution in hominids is crucial for the discernment of when and why humans have acquired our unique maturational pattern. Because the development of dentition is critically integrated into the life cycle in mammals, the determination of the time and pattern of dental development represents an appropriate method to infer changes in life history variables that occurred during hominid evolution. Here we present evidence derived from Lower Pleistocene human fossil remains… 

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