A model of mass extinction.

@article{Newman1997AMO,
  title={A model of mass extinction.},
  author={Mark E. J. Newman},
  journal={Journal of theoretical biology},
  year={1997},
  volume={189 3},
  pages={
          235-52
        }
}
  • M. Newman
  • Published 12 February 1997
  • Economics
  • Journal of theoretical biology
In the last few years a number of authors have suggested that evolution may be a so-called self-organized critical phenomenon, and that critical processes might have a significant effect on the dynamics of ecosystems. In particular it has been suggested that mass extinction may arise through a purely biotic mechanism as the result of "coevolutionary avalanches". In this paper we first explore the empirical evidence which has been put forward in favor of this conclusion. The data center… 

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