A model of constant random sperm displacement during mating: evidence from Scatophaga

@article{Parker1991AMO,
  title={A model of constant random sperm displacement during mating: evidence from Scatophaga},
  author={G. Parker and L. Simmons},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1991},
  volume={246},
  pages={107 - 115}
}
  • G. Parker, L. Simmons
  • Published 1991
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
This paper extends the sperm displacement model of Parker et al. (Behav. Ecol. Sociobiol. 27, 55 (1990)), in which sperm displacement is viewed as a process in which one unit of sperm introduced displaces one unit of sperm from the female’s sperm stores. Here this process is envisaged in terms of the change in density of sperm in the sperm stores. In matings with virgin females, only sperm store fluid is displaced at the start of sperm transfer, but if there is swift random mixing of seminal… Expand
Sperm Displacement in the Yellow Dung Fly, Scatophaga stercoraria: An Investigation of Male and Female Processes
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A quantitative attempt to incorporate female processes into the analysis of sperm utilization patterns in insects by following the movement of the copulating male's ejaculate through the female's reproductive tract using males labeled with different radioisotopes. Expand
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It is found that in the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, the second male to mate gains fertilization precedence over previous males' sperm and fertilizes approximately two-thirds of the eggs and removed, non-self sperm may be translocated back into the reproductive tracts of new, previously unmated females, where the translocated sperm go on to gain significant fertilization success. Expand
OPTIMAL COPULA DURATION IN YELLOW DUNG FLIES: EJACULATORY DUCT DIMENSIONS AND SIZE‐DEPENDENT SPERM DISPLACEMENT
Abstract.— We aim to interpret sperm displacement in relation to male size in the yellow dung fly, Scatophaga stercoraria, and to compare the general properties of indirect and direct size‐dependentExpand
OPTIMAL COPULA DURATION IN YELLOW DUNG FLIES: EJACULATORY DUCT DIMENSIONS AND SIZE-DEPENDENT SPERM DISPLACEMENT
  • G. Parker, L. Simmons
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2000
TLDR
Both results can be explained by size-dependent changes in the ejaculatory apparatus of the male with the female's exchange rate of sperm remaining constant with respect to male size, although the possibility that this female process may accelerate with increased male size is discussed. Expand
INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN SPERM COMPETITION SUCCESS OF YELLOW DUNG FLIES, SCATOPHAGA STERCORARIA
  • L. Simmons, G. Parker
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1992
TLDR
Variation in the sperm competition success of individual male dung flies shows that “large” males have a greater rate of sperm displacement than “small’ males and the levels of prey availability during testis maturation may influence a male's success in sperm competition although his immediate mating history does not. Expand
Consequences of sperm displacement for female dung flies, Scatophaga stercoraria
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  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1998
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No evidence that female dung flies gain direct benefits from displacement of previously stored sperm in terms of increased fertility or fecundity is found, and novel findings have important implications for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of male–female interactions in sperm competition. Expand
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  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1996
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This study is the first to quantify eupyrene and apyrene sperm numbers in relation to spermatophore mass, mating history and larval diet, and suggests that males maintain sperm numbers when resources are limited, prioritising fertilization success over investment in offspring. Expand
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  • P. Eady
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The results suggested that last male sperm precedence in C. maculatus the result of sperm displacement, although the exact mechanism of displacement (sperm-for-sperm or fluid displacement) remains unknown. Expand
MICROSATELLITE ANALYSIS OF SPERM-USE PATTERNS IN THE BUSHCRICKET REQUENA VERTICALIS
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Examining the transfer, storage, and use of sperm in the bushcricket Requena verticalis, a species with male parental investment and almost complete first male paternity, it is found that only sperm from the first male to mate are transported to the spermatheca. Expand
Predicting variation in sperm precedence
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INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN SPERM COMPETITION SUCCESS OF YELLOW DUNG FLIES, SCATOPHAGA STERCORARIA
  • L. Simmons, G. Parker
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1992
TLDR
Variation in the sperm competition success of individual male dung flies shows that “large” males have a greater rate of sperm displacement than “small’ males and the levels of prey availability during testis maturation may influence a male's success in sperm competition although his immediate mating history does not. Expand
Sperm competition and its evolutionary effect on copula duration in the fly Scatophaga stercoraria
TLDR
Using the model to assess the fertilization rate ( eggs/min) achieved by males with varying copula durations in the present population and theoretical populations where the duration is both greater and smaller than at present, it can be predicted that selection would favour a value close to that observed. Expand
Sperm (ejaculate) competition in Drosophila melanogaster, and the reproductive value of females to males in relation to female age and mating status
1 In double mating experiments with Drosophila melanogaster in which one male had been irradiated, it was confirmed that sperm displacement is extensive, i.e. the second male to mate displaces mostExpand
Female choice in the field cricket
TLDR
This study shows that multiple mating is a potential mechanism of mate choice in the field cricket G. birnaculatus and indicates that large males tend to win aggressive disputes, are more likely to occupy calling sites and thus ultimately achieve a greater mating success (Simmons 1986). Expand
The Reproductive Behaviour and the Nature of Sexual Selection in Scatophaga Stercoraria L. (Diptera : Scatophagidae)
TLDR
Females in all stages of their reproductive cycle around dung are equally attractive in eliciting encounters from searching males, but females which have completed oviposition are much less attractive to males on contact and though about 35% of post-oviposition females copulate as a result of their first encounter, only about half of them will have begun genital contact even if allowed six encounters with males. Expand
SPERM COMPETITION AND ITS EVOLUTIONARY CONSEQUENCES IN THE INSECTS
The possible advantages to a species of internal rather than external fertilization have frequently been stressed, though one important point appears persistently to have escaped comment. In terms ofExpand
Removal and subsequent ingestion of rivals' semen during copulation in a tree cricket
TLDR
It is suggested that rivals' semen is flushed out of the female?s sperm storage organ by the semen of the last male during post‐copulatory oro‐genital grooming. Expand
Female choice in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus (De Geer)
TLDR
This study shows that multiple mating is a potential mechanism of mate choice and a function of multiple mating may be to dilute the sperm stored from previous matings with that of the current male, so increasing his representation in offspring production. Expand
Dual Function of the Damselfly Penis: Sperm Removal and Transfer
The male of Calopteryx maculata (Beauvois) (Odonata) uses its penis not only to transfer sperm to the female but also to remove sperm deposited in the female's sperm storage organs from previousExpand
Animal Behavior as a Strategy Optimizer: Evolution of Resource Assessment Strategies and Optimal Emigration Thresholds
TLDR
Models are proposed which examine emigration thresholds from resource patches encountered within a given search strategy and the departure rate can be defined for several situations; there is strong evidence that such strategies exist in natural populations. Expand
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