A model for the evolution of despotic versus egalitarian societies

@article{Vehrencamp1983AMF,
  title={A model for the evolution of despotic versus egalitarian societies},
  author={Sandra L. Vehrencamp},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1983},
  volume={31},
  pages={667-682}
}
Abstract I present an optimization model that defines some conditions under which group-living and cooperating individuals interact in a despotic versus and egalitarian manner. The model assumes that dominants within groups can bias resources or fitness in their favour to the limits established by the subordinates' options outside the group. Ecological factors, such as the cost of dispersing and relative benefit of group living compared to solitary living, determine the subordinates' options… 
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