A model-based assessment of the cost–utility of strategies to identify Lynch syndrome in early-onset colorectal cancer patients

@article{Snowsill2015AMA,
  title={A model-based assessment of the cost–utility of strategies to identify Lynch syndrome in early-onset colorectal cancer patients},
  author={T. Snowsill and N. Huxley and M. Hoyle and T. Jones-Hughes and H. Coelho and Chris Cooper and I. Frayling and C. Hyde},
  journal={BMC Cancer},
  year={2015},
  volume={15}
}
BackgroundLynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Individuals with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian and other cancers. Lynch syndrome remains underdiagnosed in the UK. Reflex testing for Lynch syndrome in early-onset colorectal cancer patients is proposed as a method to identify more families affected by Lynch syndrome and offer… Expand
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When is Genomic Testing Cost-Effective? Testing for Lynch Syndrome in Patients with Newly-Diagnosed Colorectal Cancer and Their Relatives
TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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PurposeLynch syndrome (LS) screening can significantly reduce cancer morbidity and mortality in mutation carriers. Our aim was to identify cost-effective LS screening programs that can be implementedExpand
Clinical and Cost Effectiveness of Two “New” Lynch Syndrome Case Finding Protocols in Endometrial Cancer Population Contrasted with the IHC-based Protocol
TLDR
The bFHQ and direct-to-sequencing LS screening protocols are more effective and cost effective at identifying LS index cases than the standard IHC-based protocol under the conditions represented in the models. Expand
Personalized medicine in colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment: a systematic review of health economic evaluations
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Mismatch repair deficiency testing in clinical practice
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The genetic basis of Lynch Syndrome, methodologies of MMR deficiency testing, and current diagnostic algorithms in the clinical management of Lynch syndrome are discussed. Expand
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Widespread colorectal tumor testing to identify families with the Lynch syndrome could yield substantial benefits at acceptable costs, particularly for women with a mutation associated with thelyn syndrome who begin regular screening and have risk-reducing surgery. Expand
Health Benefits and Cost-Effectiveness of Primary Genetic Screening for Lynch Syndrome in the General Population
TLDR
Primary screening of individuals for mismatch repair gene mutations, starting with risk assessment between the ages of 25 and 35, followed by genetic testing of those whose risk exceeds 5%, is a strategy that could improve health outcomes in a cost-effective manner relative to current practice. Expand
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TLDR
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