A mixed-handed advantage in episodic memory: A possible role of interhemispheric interaction

@article{Propper2005AMA,
  title={A mixed-handed advantage in episodic memory: A possible role of interhemispheric interaction},
  author={Ruth E Propper and Stephen D. Christman and Keri Ann Phaneuf},
  journal={Memory \& Cognition},
  year={2005},
  volume={33},
  pages={751-757}
}
Recent behavioral and brain imaging data indicate that performance on explicit tests of episodic memory is associated with interaction between the left and right cerebral hemispheres, in contrast with the unihemispheric basis for implicit tests of memory. In the present work, individual differences in strength of personal handedness were used as markers for differences in hemispheric communication, with mixed-handers inferred to have increased interhemispheric interaction relative to strong… 
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TLDR
These findings are interpreted in terms of the more diffuse spread of activation among conceptual representations in the right hemisphere, and greater access to right hemisphere processes in mixed handers.
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TLDR
Using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a simple, non-invasive measure of frontal lobe activity during encoding and recall of list words in inconsistent- and consistent-handers found the first evidence for handedness differences in brain activity that are associated with the handedness Differences in episodic retrieval.
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