A millisecond pulsar

@article{Backer1982AMP,
  title={A millisecond pulsar},
  author={D. Backer and S. Kulkarni and C. Heiles and M. Davis and W. Goss},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1982},
  volume={300},
  pages={615-618}
}
The radio properties of 4C21.53 have been an enigma for many years. First, the object displays interplanetary scintillations (IPS) at 81 MHz, indicating structure smaller than 1 are s, despite its low galactic latitude (−0.3°)1. IPS modulation is rare at low latitudes because of interstellar angular broadening. Second, the source has an extremely steep (∼v−2) spectrum at decametric wavelengths2. This combination of properties suggested that 4C21.53 was either an undetected pulsar or a member of… Expand
A Very Luminous Binary Millisecond Pulsar
We report the discovery of a field binary millisecond pulsar, J0218+4232, with a period of 2.3 ms and in a 2.0 day binary orbit with a 0.16 M☉ companion. The new pulsar was serendipitously discoveredExpand
The Millisecond Pulsar a
Backer er al. have reported the exciting discovery of a 1.56-ms radio pulsar,’ whose period is 21 times smaller than that of the Crab pulsar, hitherto the fastest known. The neutron star in thisExpand
Optical identification of the millisecond pulsar 1937+214
Backer et al.1 have reported the discovery of a pulsar with the period of 1.558 ms, identified with the source 1937 + 214 (=4021.53). The extreme rotational velocity and high energy loss rate of thisExpand
The 1.5‐Millisecond Pulsar
Recent observations of the 1.5-msec pulsar in the field of 4C21.53 are summarized and discussed. Its nondetection in earlier pulsar searches is attributed to insufficient search range. It is inferredExpand
Extreme Spinning Tops
TLDR
Observations of the same binary star system over 10 years confirm a scenario of how pulsars form and evolve, and provide evidence in support of a long-suspected evolutionary scenario in the formation of such extreme objects. Expand
A Radio Pulsar Spinning at 716 Hz
TLDR
A 716-hertz eclipsing binary radio pulsar in the globular cluster Terzan 5 using the Green Bank Telescope is discovered, it is the fastest spinning neutron star found to date, and constrains models that suggest that gravitational radiation, through an r-mode (Rossby wave) instability, limits the maximum spin frequency of neutron stars. Expand
The High Time Resolution Universe Survey II: Discovery of 5 Millisecond Pulsars
We present the discovery of 5 millisecond pulsars found in the mid-Galactic latitude portion of the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) Survey. The pulsars have rotational periods from ~2.3 to ~7.5Expand
Low-frequency polarimetry of the millisecond pulsar PSR1937 + 214
Pulsars with periods of a few milliseconds1,2 test theories of the radio emission process in extreme conditions. The velocity of light radius, which is an important scale-length in most theories, isExpand
Discovery of a 205.89 Hz accreting-millisecond X-ray pulsar in the globular cluster NGC 6440
We report the discovery of the second accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP) in the globular cluster NGC 6440. Pulsations with a frequency of 205.89 Hz were detected with the Rossi X-Ray TimingExpand
Rapid photometry of supernova 1987A: a 2.14 ms pulsar?
Abstract We have monitored Supernova 1987A in optical/near-infrared bands using various high-speed photometers from a few weeks following its birth until early 1996 in order to search for a pulsarExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-6 OF 6 REFERENCES
Optical identification of the millisecond pulsar 1937+214
Backer et al.1 have reported the discovery of a pulsar with the period of 1.558 ms, identified with the source 1937 + 214 (=4021.53). The extreme rotational velocity and high energy loss rate of thisExpand
Interstellar scattering, the North Polar Spur, and a possible new class of compact galactic radio sources
A reanalysis of the Cambridge interplanetary scintillation (IPS) catalog of angular sizes of radio sources reveals that there is no statistically significant evidence for increased interstellarExpand
Evidence for an Unusual Source of High Radio Brightness Temperature in the Crab Nebula
working at A = 3·39μ. While the accuracy achieved was poorer than that of the latter method, considerable refinement of the accuracy should be possible. Moreover, the difficulties which arise in theExpand
Galactic Structure and the Apparent Size of Radio Sources
Observations of radio sources at 81.5 MHz show that interstellar scattering is more important than some pulsar data suggest. Low frequency measurements also provide a new means for studying theExpand