A method for quantitative assessment of artifacts in EEG, and an empirical study of artifacts

@article{Kappel2014AMF,
  title={A method for quantitative assessment of artifacts in EEG, and an empirical study of artifacts},
  author={Simon Lind Kappel and David Looney and Danilo P. Mandic and Preben Kidmose},
  journal={2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society},
  year={2014},
  pages={1686-1690}
}
  • S. L. Kappel, D. Looney, +1 author P. Kidmose
  • Published 6 November 2014
  • Engineering, Computer Science, Medicine
  • 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Wearable EEG systems for continuous brain monitoring is an emergent technology that involves significant technical challenges. Some of these are related to the fact that these systems operate in conditions that are far less controllable with respect to interference and artifacts than is the case for conventional systems. Quantitative assessment of artifacts provides a mean for optimization with respect to electrode technology, electrode location, electronic instrumentation and system design. To… 
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