Corpus ID: 55796265

A method for calculating means and variances of comparative data for use in a phylogenetic analysis of variance

@article{Lindenfors2006AMF,
  title={A method for calculating means and variances of comparative data for use in a phylogenetic analysis of variance},
  author={Patrik Lindenfors},
  journal={Evolutionary Ecology Research},
  year={2006},
  volume={8},
  pages={975-995}
}
Question: Is there a general method for applying an analysis of variance (ANOVA) to phylogenetic data sets that allows for the incorporation of any assumption of evolutionary model? Mathematical method: I describe a method that enables the calculation of means and variances of the traits of monophyletically related species. These means and variances are calculated using evolutionary rates derived from estimated nodal values and can thus incorporate any assumption of evolutionary model… Expand
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