A meta-analysis on the association between bladder cancer and occupation

@article{Reulen2008AMO,
  title={A meta-analysis on the association between bladder cancer and occupation},
  author={Raoul C. Reulen and Eliane Kellen and Frank Buntinx and Maree T. Brinkman and Maurice P. A. Zeegers},
  journal={Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology},
  year={2008},
  volume={42},
  pages={64 - 78}
}
To date, many epidemiological studies have been conducted to examine the association between occupation and bladder cancer incidence. However, results from these studies often have been inconsistent, and significant associations have rarely been found, possibly owing to the lack of adequate statistical power in these studies. This meta-analysis summarizes the relevant literature regarding occupation and bladder cancer incidence to increase the statistical power to detect associations. The… 
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References

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TLDR
It is suggested that occupational exposures may play a significant role in the risk of bladder cancer.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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